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Escapee! High diving fish | Home Fish Aquarium Guide

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Escapee! High diving fish


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Well I picked up another three neon tetras to add in to the previous three. I was acclimating them to the tank as usual. The bag had floated and several cups of water from the tank added to the bag. Then I gently poured them out into a bucket and got the first one moved into the tank, netted and in the tank with no problem. I caught the second one and was raising it to the tank when I felt a twinge from the net. NO! I looked into the bucket, only one fish down there. I looked into the net, no fish! Then it flinched again, it was on the floor about a foot from the bucket. I eased it back into the net and started to put my hand back over the net (which is what I had started to do when it did it’s high dive. As I raised it up to the tank level and started to move my hand away…. it flipped AGAIN, over my hand and high dive into the bucket !!!!!!!!! A good five foot dive (which given it’s body size…. is really an amazing dive.


I finally managed to get it and the other tetra into the tank and let them acclimate. When I cut on the lights one of the neon tetras looked a bit pale with washed out colors (I suspect that was the high diving fish.) After about a half hour it seemed to settle down and the colors came out better. All of the tetras found each other and it seemed to help. I’m really hoping that he/she isn’t damaged at this point.

Moral of the story is to make extra care to hold a hand over the net as you move it to the tank.

I’m even thinking of getting some of those little specimen containers – fill them with tank water move the fish into those at the bucket and then move them up to the tank. I used to net them out of the bag while it was floating in the tank. I’m afraid though that I’ll spill fish store water into the tank, or hurt a fish trying to maneuverer the net in such a small place.

–update– 2 days later..

I have one neon tetra that has died. At this point I can only assume that this is the one that did the high dive (twice). I’ve done the math and it fell the equivalent of 19 stories (scaled for it’s body size) the first time onto the carpet and even more the second time into the bucket of water. This afternoon I was on the phone and saw Myke, a large female platy/sword nibbling at a neon tetra. (I hadn’t noticed this more obvious nibbling before and on closer inspection saw that the tetra was struggling, but alive. I shewed the platy away a couple times and went to gather temporary hospital tank supplies. By the time I gathered a small container to scoop him/her out with it had already passed. There were a few spasms before I was able to get the container out and ready. For the most part, the body is intact and looks relatively healthy and normal. The coloration was a bit muted. Fins look intact. I at first was concerned for neon tetra disease, but don’t see any indicators of it. Ammonia in the tank reads 0. I haven’t tested nitrites lately, but we’re so heavily planted I doubt there are any. (Although I will test again here in a few minutes.)

So, unless we have another death my theory is that the high dive caused internal injuries (or my retrieval of the fish from the floor could have as well.) It has succumbed to those injuries two days later. (I really wish there were a good way to differentiate between the different neon tetras…. id bracelet for fish?) Oooo… I can see a smartphone app that can give an augmented reality view of your tank with fish tagged by their rfid chip. (Maybe even log the history of fish – when purchased…. etc.) For more expensive stock – this could be a good idea. (Just like animal tracking in the wild.)

–update – 0 nitrites – nitrates will not be tested – have not registered after the plants got established. Last tested 2 days ago reading was 0.

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March 10, 2011 - 9:36 PM
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